HMCS Sackville

Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville
Hmcs Sackville

HMCS Sackville, a National Historic Site, was one of more than 120 corvettes built in Canada during the Second World War and the last of the Allies 269 corvettes that played a major role in winning the pivotal Battle of the Atlantic. She was commissioned in Saint John, NB in December 1941 and served in several well-known escort groups operating primarily between St John’s, Newfoundland and Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Corvettes were the workhorses of the North Atlantic, escorting merchant convoys to Europe and defending against German U-Boats. During the hostilities (1939-1945) the Royal Canadian Navy escorted 25,343 merchant vessels carrying critical supplies and war material across the Atlantic. Sackville -- named after the Town of Sackville, NB-- is owned and operated by the volunteer Canadian Naval Memorial Trust and was designated Canada’s Naval Memorial in 1985. During the summer the ship welcomes visitors at her berth next to the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic and throughout the year supports naval, community, youth and corporate events and activities. Given Sackville’s age and the need for hull and related repairs the Canadian Government announced in January, 2018 a significant funding contribution to ensure the long-term preservation and operation of the iconic wartime corvette.

 
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