Fort Sackville

Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville
Fort Sackville

The first British settlers arrived under the Honourable Edward Cornwallis to establish Halifax in 1749. Given that local Indigenous forces were allied with France and hostile to Britain, the need to secure the settlement from attack was paramount.

While the main settlement was being constructed at Halifax, the irregular company of Goreham’s Rangers was sent, with an armed sloop, to the head of Bedford Basin to establish control of the lines of communication with the British settlements at Minas and Annapolis Royal. The outpost would become Fort Sackville, named for George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville.

Initially consisting of a small palisaded fort which would eventually incorporate a barracks for 50 men and a small blockhouse, the fortification was built on a small elevation just east of where the Sackville River empties into Bedford Basin. The blockhouse would have resembled to one that stands today at Fort Edward in Windsor, armed with a small cannon (likely a short brass 3-pounder) and a few swivel guns. In late September 1752, Mi'kmaq stripped and scalped a man they had caught outside the palisade of Fort Sackville; in 1759 during the French and Indian War (1754-1763) Mi'kmaq killed two labourers there.

The barracks were rebuilt in 1798 and at that time accommodated an officer and 32 men; its purpose by then was to intercept military deserters from Halifax. By 1860 an Ordnance Ground had been established at the site, with storehouses and fuel yards in addition to the barracks.

Scott Manor House was built in 1770 next to Fort Sackville as the family home for Joseph Scott and his wife Margaret (Cottnam). Scott was an Irish settler who arrived in Halifax in 1749 with Edward Cornwallis. Today nothing remains of Fort Sackville, but the Scott Manor House still stands, the second-oldest house in the Halifax Regional Municipality.

 
 
 

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