Bellevue House

Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House
Bellevue House

The house speaks to Halifax's rich military past and the evolution of Spring Garden Road into the most prominent street in Halifax. The house was built as a three storey Georgian mansion, in 1801. The house was used as the residence for the commander (commandant) of armed forces for British North America. The site also had other adjunct buildings for officers barracks.

Two famous persons connected to Bellevue House were Governor of Nova Scotia, general and diplomat Sir Charles Hastings Doyle. He was knighted for his efforts in defending Nova Scotia against the Fenian Rebellions and American threats. He played key roles in Nova Scotia in mediation for confederation in Canada. Second close association is Adele Hugo, (1830-1915), daughter of Victor Hugo. She was a frequent visitor to Bellevue House as she waited for her tragic love of army officer Albert Pinson. For Adele this love ended not well and saw her suffering a break down. She spent her days in a asylum in Paris. Also important to note that many British Royals from Queen Victoria's father the Duke of Kent to Edward VII spent time at Bellevue House.

By 1878 generals delinked to live at the house siting it as being out of date. In 1885 a large fire struck the house but it was rebuilt and used as headquarters for officers. In 1917 during the Halifax Explosion the building was used as a temporary hospital. After which Bellevue House became the headquarter office for the maritime phone company. A plaque about this stood on the site until 2013 with the the building of the Halifax Central Library. The plaque has vanished with no knowledge of its location. While building the library a archeological excavation was completed which yielded a treasure trove of artefacts. These artefacts revealed Halifax's rich military history and evidence was found of a smaller foundation that predated Bellevue House. Clearly the site was used from 1749 onward.

Sadly the property in 1955 was deemed surplus lands by the armed forces and Bellevue House was demolished. After which the land served as a parking lot and for many years was home to the Halifax Jazz Festival. As noted previously the site is now home to the Halifax Central Library.

 
 
 

The Halifax Military Heritage Preservation Society is committed to safeguarding the personal information (including a member’s name, contact information, age, military affiliation, if any, and educational background, etc.) entrusted to the Society by our members in accordance with privacy issues and PIPEDA and/or provincial legislation and any applicable laws and regulations.


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